Graduate Students

Matthew Stanley

(stanleymattl9@gmail.com)

 

Matthew Stanley graduated from Wake Forest University with a B.S. in psychology and a B.A. in philosophy. There, he published several papers on network analyses of neuroimaging data with Dr. Paul Laurienti and Dr. Dale Dagenbach. He is now a PhD student in Psychology & Neuroscience at Duke University who entered through the Cognitive Neuroscience Admitting Program. Matthew works with Elizabeth Marsh, Roberto Cabeza, Felipe De Brigard, and Walter Sinnott-Armstrong to answer questions involving memory, morality, truth, and reasons from computational, behavioral, and philosophical perspectives.

 

Zachary Monge

(zachary.monge@duke.edu)

 

I am a PhD student studying cognitive neuroscience. My research is focused on investigating age-related differences in representations, specifically the utilization of perceptual vs. semantic representations. For this line of work, I utilize multivariate techniques (e.g., representational similarity analyses) and machine learning algorithms (e.g., deep convolutional neural networks, SVMs). In another line of work, I am examining age-related differences in the topology of large scale networks (both functional and structural). For this line of work, I utilize multivariate connectivity analyses within a graph theoretical framework. Please view my CV for a full list of my publications. CV

 

Benjamin Geib

(benjamin.geib@duke.edu)

Benjamin Geib graduated from Bucknell University with a B.S. in biomedical engineering. Following two years of translational neuroscience research at UC Davis under Cameron Carter, he is now a PhD student in Psychology & Neuroscience at Duke University working with Roberto Cabeza and Marty Woldorff. His research at Duke focuses on how attention modulates memory, the timing of mnemonic reactivation, and network interactions that subserve memory retrieval. In addressing these questions, he has gained expertise in representational similarity analysis, multivariate pattern analysis, and network analysis – custom code and toolboxes associated with some of these methods is freely available at GitHub

 

Lifu Deng

(lifu.deng@duke.edu)

 

Lifu Deng a graduate student in the Cognitive Neuroscience Admitting Program 2017 cohort. He graduated from Shanghai Jiao Tong University with B.S. in Biomedical Engineering & Applied Mathematics, and M.S. in Biomedical Engineering. Lifu is interested in the dynamics of functional networks in the brain, how it is linked to cognition, and how it is influenced by structural connectivity and stimulation.

 

Eric Juarez

(eric.juarez@duke.edu)

 

I am a graduate student working with both Roberto Cabeza and Gregory Samanez-Larkin. My primary research interest is how memory and imagination interact with decision-making processes and how this changes across the lifespan. I am also interested in using memory and imagination as a motivation for healthy behavior and social decision-making. In this lab, I work with functional magnetic imaging data and use graph theory to investigate networks underlying episodic-memory based decisions.

 

Joshua Stivers

(joshua.stivers@duke.edu)

 

Joshua Stivers is interested in the analysis of sensory and cognitive representations in the brain, and how task features predict the modulations of said representations. He hopes to use fMRI to probe the underlying network dynamics, and single-unit recording to investigate the finer-grained temporal features.

 

 

Eva Gjorgieva

(eva.gjorgieva@duke.edu)

 

Eva Gjorgieva graduated from Loyola University Chicago in 2015 with a B.S. in psychology and minor in neuroscience. She is currently pursuing a PhD in Cognitive Neuroscience under the supervision of Drs. Marty Woldorff, Roberto Cabeza, and Tobias Egner. Eva’s research focuses on the ways in which interactions between internally-directed and externally-directed attention are coordinated as a function of intentionality and how this predicts subsequent memory. In addition, Eva is interested in understanding post-error adjustments in attention and cognitive control and their influence on memory.